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RESEARCH

 

DISSERTATION 

A MULTICULTURAL EUROPE? SOCIOCULTURAL CONFLICT IN A GLOBALIZED ERA

In my dissertation, I examine how political conflict over immigration and nationalism in advanced democracies is shaping, and reshaping, mass political attitudes and voting behavior. In one paper, forthcoming in the British Journal of Political Science, I explore a phenomenon I term "liberal nationalism," which is an attitude configuration combining opposition to immigration with otherwise progressive attitudes. Another project examines the roots of anti-Muslim sentiment through an original conjoint experiment fielded in the US and Norway. Additionally, I explore how the Syrian refugee crisis has affected immigration attitudes in post-communist Europe, a region where the immigration has not been historically politicized.

OTHER WORK

In other work, I analyze other aspects of attitudes and ideology. A current project with Marc Hetherington and Isaac Mehlhaff examines the relationships between pre-political attitudes ("worldview"), ideology, and vote choice using original survey data from the US and the UK. Kaitlin Alper and I study how regional identities in Western Europe relate to vote choice. Further, with Ashley Anderson, I use latent variable models to uncover whether voters in Muslim-majority countries have coherent ideologies that reflect elite cleavages.